Interrupted by God? Interrupted by God!

By Kenneth D. MacHarg

“We must be ready to allow ourselves to be interrupted by God. God will be constantly crossing our paths and canceling our plans by sending us people with claims and petitions.” ― Dietrich BonhoefferLife Together: The Classic Exploration of Christian Community

What do you want to be when you grow up? You know that question, you were asked it when you were a child or teenager and you may have asked if of your own children.

But, there comes a point in life where we no longer want to deal with such questions. For one, we may have already decided. Or, perhaps we think we have.

Or, maybe, we have made that decision several times and still find ourselves drifting with no definitive response and are too embarrassed to admit it.

Or, we think we are too old to deal with it—we are at or almost at retirement age and it is no longer relevant. Go away, don’t ask. Don’t interrupt. Just let me finish off and get on with whatever.

No matter your place on the time line of life, those words about allowing God to interrupt our life can come as a shock, a disappointment, an annoyance, or, they can be a breath of fresh air, a hope of significance, a promise of something more fulfilling. A promise to fit ourselves into God’s will for us (rather than trying to persuade God to fit into our own will).

The Lord comes and interrupts us at the most unexpected times.

  • It may be in the midst of completing our education.
  • It may be in the middle of establishing our careers or business
  • It may be in the middle of raising our children, or paying off our mortgage.
  • It may be as we are enjoying the empty nest and grandchildren.
  • Or it may come to us in retirement.

Whenever, we must be open to having our lives interrupted by our Lord as he calls us to serve Him in some capacity.

That call can come to any one of us at any time, from childhood to our senior years.

And, no, it is not just for pastors or Bible teachers or doctors. Yes, it is for them, but it is also for

  • Engineers
  • House parents
  • Secretaries
  • Hairdressers
  • Carpenters
  • Nurses
  • Teachers
  • Writers
  • Photographers
  • Business people
  • Executives
  • Plumbers
  • Telephone repair people
  • Car mechanics
  • Librarians

You name it; there are openings in the Lord’s kingdom service for each of these and more.

Each of those I have named, we have seen at work on the mission field.

And, it comes at any age. In his captivating book, Don’t Waste Your Life, John Piper speaks about retirement by re-telling two stories:

Story 1: “In April 2000, Ruby Eliason and Laura Edwards were killed in Cameroon, West Africa. Ruby was over eighty. Single all her life, she poured it out for one great thing: to make Jesus Christ known among the unreached, the poor, and the sick. Laura was a widow, a medical doctor, pushing eighty years old, and serving at Ruby’s side in Cameroon. The brakes failed, the car went over a cliff, and they were both killed instantly.” 1

Story 2: “[Now] Consider a story from the February 1998 edition of Reader’s Digest, which tells about a couple who ‘took early retirement from their jobs in the Northeast five years ago when he was 59 and she was 51. Now they live in Punta Gorda, Florida, where they cruise on their 30 foot trawler, play softball and collect shells.’”

The question is then posed, Which story is more tragic? Was it a tragedy that Ruby and Laura were killed at age 80 in a car accident? Or was it a tragedy that this other couple spent their lives boating, playing softball, and collecting shells? From the biblical perspective, the second story is tragic and the first story is glorious. Mark 8:35 is indicative of this, “… whoever loses his life for my sake and the gospel’s will save it.” (ESV)

Wherever you are in your life’s span, God is knocking at your door, inviting you, yes you,  to follow Him.

Are you willing to allow yourself to be “interrupted by God?”

   

Please feel free to leave comments on this site. Those comments posted through the button on this page will be posted if appropriate. Comments sent directly to me are welcome and I will respond, but they will not be posted. Also please forward this link to others who might be interested in this blog. To receive notification of future posts, please click on the “follow” button along the side of this page or write to missionaryjournalist (at) gmail (dot) com. If you no longer wish to receive these articles, please let me know at that same email address.

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Picking Cherries or Cherry-Picking ?

By Kenneth D. MacHarg

One of the many pleasures of living in Kyrgyzstan, as we did for portions of three years, was to pick cherries each spring.

First came the sour, pie cherries which we gladly picked to make cherry pie, cobbler, jam or a host of other goodies. Some friends had one of those trees in their yard and couldn’t use all of the fruit. So we spent several cool mornings picking away and adding to our supply.

About the time that the sour cherry trees completed their season, the trees bearing sweet cherries put forth their own fruit. Not only did we pick large quantities of those but, when we walked the tree-shaded streets of Bishkek, we often found cherry tree branches hanging over a fence or a wall. As we passed by, we, as well as many others, grabbed a handful to eat as we headed for our destination.

While picking cherries is a wonderful experience, I’m reminded that cherry-picking is something quite different than obtaining good fruit.

Dictionary.com defines the practice of cherry-picking as to “choose or take the best or most profitable of (a number of things), especially for one’s own benefit or gain.”

The cherry-picking that is most disturbing to me is that which involves looking for a proof-text biblical verse that supports one’s own pet belief or a point they are trying to make in a sermon or article. I often describe this process as a sermon in search of a text.

In a presentation I heard some time ago, the speaker was doing just that—presenting an inspirational message that, rather than use a biblical passage and interpreting its truth for the listener, snatched three short phrases from various places in the Bible to “prove” or illustrate his points.

In so doing, the speaker distorted the message of the biblical passage and missed the more complete teaching offered. As a result, listeners were short-changed by not allowing the text itself to reveal the complete message of the Gospel.

This is the text that the speaker used (Romans 3:23): “All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.”

Now, here is the complete section from Romans 3: 21-26 in which that quote appears:

 21 But now apart from the law the righteousness of God has been made known, to which the Law and the Prophets testify. 22 This righteousness is given through faith in Jesus Christ to all who believe. There is no difference between Jew and Gentile, 23 for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, 24 and all are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus. 25 God presented Christ as a sacrifice of atonement, through the shedding of his blood—to be received by faith. He did this to demonstrate his righteousness, because in his forbearance he had left the sins committed beforehand unpunished— 26 he did it to demonstrate his righteousness at the present time, so as to be just and the one who justifies those who have faith in Jesus.

The sharp reader will notice that the text selected was an extracted phrase from a longer sentence and paragraph. In addition, on the overhead screen where the phrase was shown, the first word, all, was capitalized as if it was the initial word of the sentence, which it isn’t in the text. In addition, the punctuation was changed from a comma at the end of the phrase to a period—leaving the listener to assume that the thought was complete.

It wasn’t.

What was missed? Plenty, but particularly in just that sentence:

  1. The teaching applies everyone, both Jews and Gentiles.
  2. The passage demonstrates that all who sin and fall short are justified by God’s grace
  3. And, it shows that God’s grace is given through redemption in Jesus Christ.

That, my friends, is the proclamation of the Gospel, the Good News, the understanding that in the face of universal sin, God’s forgiveness and grace come through Jesus Christ.

No wonder I was so frustrated that day. A grand opportunity to actually proclaim the good news of salvation through Jesus Christ was missed by a cherry-picked, incomplete quote, a changed punctuation mark, and the omission of the Gospel proclamation.

It’s a good reminder that while I will continue to pick cherries, I will always stay away from cherry-picking scripture to serve my own purpose and instead will allow God’s complete word to be proclaimed.

Unless otherwise noted, scripture taken from the HOLY BIBLE, NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION®. Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984 International Bible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved. The “NIV” and “New International Version” trademarks are registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office by International Bible Society. Use of either trademark requires the permission of International Bible Society.

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One Car to love—the saga continues!

(Here is an article I wrote in 2004 when we were living in Costa Rica. It’s light and perhaps will bring a chuckle to your day. –Ken

By Kenneth D. MacHarg

When last we joined missionaries Ken and Polly MacHarg, they were rejoicing that their “new” car was again on the road running.

You will remember that just two days after they bought their 1988 Trooper, it broke down, stalling five times in one day, once right in front of the U.S. Embassy.

A tow from a friend and three days in repair found them with new injectors and who knows what else. But, at least it was running.

We join them now as they are on their way to their teaching ministries at UNELA—The Evangelical University of the Americas.

“That sure was a good trip, wasn’t it Polly,” Ken comments

“Yes, seeing the active Arenal volcano and all of the beautiful mountain scenery was really nice,” Polly agreed.

“But that trip around Lake Arenal was something else—what a terrible bumpy road with all of those ruts, rocks and streams to cross,” Ken said. “What was that? It sounds like something fell off the back of the car.”

“Yes,” Polly said. “Maybe you had better check it.”

Ken eases the lumbering vehicle over to the curb right across from the Latin American regional headquarters of Habitat for Humanity. Stepping out, he surveys the situation and returned to the car.

“You had better get out. You’re not going to believe this, but the gas tank fell off of the car and there is gasoline spilling out onto the street!”

It took only an hour and a half for the tow truck to arrive and haul the car back to the mechanic.

Why not replace the fuel pump while we are here, Ken figures. When they did the original work they said it would need to be replaced eventually.

Four days later, Ken and Polly are back on the road—at least for a while. Two days later Ken notes that the brakes are feeling soft and not grabbing as they should.

“Hm…most of the time this thing won’t go, but now I’m afraid it may not stop!” he muses as he takes the car, this time under its own volition, back to the garage.

Now, while Troopers are fairly common in Costa Rica, it seems that, after the brakes are totally dismantled, that the mechanic can’t find the parts he needs. “I’ll probably have them tomorrow (mañana) promises the mechanic.

Definition (U.S.): Tomorrow—tomorrow.
Definition (Costa Rica): Tomorrow (mañana)—not today.

Four days later Ken again leaves the mechanic as the proud owner of a totally new brake system.

We join Ken and Polly again a few days later. It’s a Saturday afternoon and Polly has stopped at Yamuni Department Store to buy a few things.

Ring

“Hello?”

“Hi, it’s me. I’m at Yamuni and the car won’t start.”

“Oh, Ok, I’ll be right there.”

Sure enough, thirty minutes later Ken observes for himself that the car, indeed, won’t start. Now, it’s late Saturday afternoon and all of the mechanics are closed for the weekend.

But, God provides. It turns out that one of the warehouse men at Yamuni just happens to be a mechanic and just happens to have his tools with him. Of course, it has started to rain, so a few folks in the parking lot are rounded up to push the car under shelter where, 30 minutes later, the mechanic has fixed the bad battery connection, and they are again on their way.

For now.

Let’s see, that was Saturday. The next Thursday, Ken is at the Escazú Christian Fellowship’s Men’s breakfast that he leads. Coming out of the restaurant, Ken finds that, once again, the car won’t start.

“Pour some coke on the connection, it will clean up all of that corrosion,” advises a fellow gringo who has stopped at Bagelmen’s to pick up his breakfast. “If that doesn’t work, I have jumper cables.”

Coke? “Let’s see, diet or regular…I suppose it doesn’t matter,” Ken muses as he pours the soft-drink on the connection. Presto—the corrosion immediately disappears. “I wonder what it does to your stomach?” he thinks, but quickly dismisses the thought.

One jump later, Ken is at a new mechanic from which, thirty minutes later, he drives out as the proud owner of a new Rocket brand car battery.

Now begins several weeks of tranquility and smooth running. Ken and Polly and Polly’s ESL intern drive a horrendous mountain road to the beach and return to San José without incident.

(They can’t tell you what the mileage on that trip was. When they bought the car the odometer said 84,000 miles. Today, three months later, it still says 84,000 miles. Perhaps that ought to be fixed sometime!)

All was going well…until Wednesday.

We join Ken and Polly as they leave their house headed for their evening Bible Study. It has been an extremely rainy day, downpours all afternoon—after all, this is rainy season in Costa Rica.

“Hmmm, Ken thinks. I can’t get the key into the lock. Polly, it looks like something happened to this lock—maybe somebody tried to get in. Can you open the door from your side?”

“Sure, give me a minute.”

A minute later, Ken and Polly see the reason for the lock problem. They are no longer the proud owners of a car radio. It seems that during the rain storm when everybody was inside, someone manipulated the lock and stole the car radio.

“I never keep a radio in my car,” explains Don Franklin of UNELA the next day. “If I do, someone will either break the window or damage the lock to get in and steal it. If I want a radio, I carry one with me.”

“At least the car is still running, but they stole the radio,” Ken tells the Bible study that night.

“I wish they had stolen the whole car,” Polly says.

“Me to.”

Please feel free to leave comments on this site. Those comments posted through the button on this page will be posted if appropriate. Comments sent directly to me are welcome and I will respond, but they will not be posted. Also please forward this link to others who might be interested in this blog. To receive notification of future posts, please click on the “follow” button at the top of this page or write to missionaryjournalist (at) gmail (dot) com. If you no longer wish to receive these announcements, please let me know at that same email address.

Too flip or just right?

By Kenneth D. MacHarg

The first time I heard our friend pray, I was surprised, and perhaps a little shocked.

I had always begun my prayers by addressing God as “Our Father”, or “Almighty God” or some such phrase that described Him as all-powerful, almighty, all-sovereign.

But our friend began her prayers simply with “Father Dear.”

Father Dear? That’s different, isn’t it? For me, at first hearing, it was a little, well, too personal, too flip, too casual, too informal.

Father Dear. It certainly makes you think.

Eventually I came to realize that perhaps what we are missing in our prayers is that level of personal contact, of familiarity with our sovereign, all-powerful, all-knowing God who came to live among us in human form, knowing our desires and our frustrations, our faith and our doubt, our accomplishments and our sin.

And, I eventually realized that what we need is not only an affirmation of God’s power and sovereignty, but also an affirmation of his love, his care, his concern, his compassion, his forgiveness and his grace.

Perhaps, along with recognizing God’s might, we need to also recognize his tender care.

When we pray, we encounter an almighty God. An almighty God who is compassionate and forgiving and loving…and dear.

I serve a risen Savior, He’s in the world today
I know that He is living, whatever men may say
I see His hand of mercy, I hear His voice of cheer
And just the time I need Him He’s always near

In all the world around me I see His loving care
And though my heart grows weary I never will despair
I know that He is leading, through all the stormy blast
The day of His appearing will come at last

Rejoice, rejoice, O Christian. Lift up your voice and sing
Eternal hallelujahs to Jesus Christ, the King
The Hope of all who seek Him, the Help of all who find
None other is so loving, so good and kind

He lives He lives,  Christ Jesus lives today
He walks with me and talks with me
Along life’s narrow way
He lives He lives , Salvation to impart
You ask me how I know He lives?
He lives within my heart

Please feel free to leave comments on this site. Those comments posted through the button on this page will be posted if appropriate. Comments sent directly to me are welcome and I will respond, but they will not be posted. Also please forward this link to others who might be interested in this blog. To receive notification of future posts, please click on the “follow” button at the top of this page or write to missionaryjournalist (at) gmail (dot) com. If you no longer wish to receive these announcements, please let me know at that same email address.

Consider Kyrgyzstan or Honduras or Kenya: On finding something significant to do with the rest of our life

By Kenneth D. MacHarg

“I want to do something significant with the rest of my life.” That’s what a former parishioner at an international church said to me in a recent conversation.

Not that he hasn’t already accomplished a lot: a high-profile job assisting his government afforded him comforts such as time for family vacations and travel. There was time for playing with his son. And to think.

I referred him to missionnext.org, a web site designed to help people focus on the last third of their life and use it to the glory of the Lord.

Certainly there are significant needs out there. Missionary Doug Nichols recently wrote, “Statistics say there are at least two billion people in the world with no near neighbor Christian to tell them of Christ (and salvation only through Him). So, if your church sent a missionary to serve with 10,000 of these unreached people (street children, prisoners, etc.), there would be a need for 200,000 additional missionaries now.”

Dr. Nichols added, “Perhaps you will seriously consider this desperate need (whether your church is 75 people or 3000) to pray, work, train, and trust God to send one or two missionaries from your church yearly. Yes yearly!

Women missionaries, ages 25-55, are needed to work with the 153 million orphans worldwide and the 100 million street children.

Mature, godly couples, ages 45-75, are needed to encourage and help train over three million undertrained, needy pastors throughout the world.

Evangelical men and women, all ages but especially older evangelicals, are needed to work in and outside the jails and prisons of the world with prisoners and their families. Some jail cells in Asia made for 12 prisoners are crowed with 50.”

One or two missionaries from our church yearly? Certainly he must be kidding.

But, why not? When was the last time that we prayed, individually or as a congregation, that the Lord would raise up pastors and missionaries from our church? When was the last time that we suggested to our young people or adults seeking a career change that being a Christian counselor, a seminary professor, a Christian education worker or a pastor was a worthy occupational goal? When did we recently encourage someone to become a career missionary?

I was very moved by what a Kyrgyz friend living in India where her husband is a pastor wrote to me a few weeks ago. She said,Please, whenever you have chance, share about Kyrgyzstan. We still need missionaries there. Does your church send missionaries out? Do you have outreach trips?

Despite all of the missionaries who have served since the early church, there is still a desperate need for more. In Romans 10 we read, “Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved.” 14 How, then, can they call on the one they have not believed in? And how can they believe in the one of whom they have not heard? And how can they hear without someone preaching to them? 15 And how can anyone preach unless they are sent?

As my Kyrgyz friend says, “We still need missionaries” in Kyrgyzstan and that applies elsewhere as well.

In his book Life Together, the theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer wrote these challenging words: “We must be ready to allow ourselves to be interrupted by God.”

Whether you are 21 years old and completing your education; in your 30s starting your family; in your 40s grappling with mid-life crisis; 50s or 60s looking forward to retirement; or 70s wondering what you can do “to finish the race and complete the task the Lord Jesus has given me—the task of testifying to the good news of God’s grace.” (Acts 20:24), consider the needs of those around you and in other parts of the world, consider Kyrgyzstan or Honduras or Kenya, check out missionnext.org (it’s a good place to start no matter your age) and find something very significant to do with the rest of the life God has given to you.

Please feel free to leave comments on this site. Those comments posted through the button on this page will be posted if appropriate. Comments sent directly to me are welcome and I will respond, but they will not be posted. Also please forward this link to others who might be interested in this blog. To receive notification of future posts, please click on the “follow” button at the top of this page or write to missionaryjournalist (at) gmail (dot) com. If you no longer wish to receive these announcements, please let me know at that same email address.

In the midst of a tragedy, Who was Marjory Stoneman Douglas?

By Kenneth D. MacHarg

It should not be surprising in the light of the events at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida that most of us missed the irony of the tragedy occurring at that facility.

The school was named after an outstanding writer and social activist who is given much of the credit for establishing the Everglades National Park and saving the vast “river of grass” from development and destruction. In fact, the school is located less than two miles from the park boundary.

On the park’s website Mrs. Douglas is described as being “ahead of her time” in recognizing the value of preserving the Everglades. Many have compared the influence of her book, The Everglades: River of Glass, to that of Rachel Carson’s seminal Silent Spring which warned of the dangers to all natural systems from the misuse of chemical pesticides such as DDT.

Douglas worked at the Miami Herald, first as a society reporter, then as an editorial page columnist. Later she took on the fight for feminism, racial justice, and conservation long before those causes became popular.

Her book, published in 1947 — the year Everglades National Park was established, developed public awareness of the natural and touristic value of the area.  A revised edition was published in 1987 to draw attention to the continuing threats to the vast waterway even though it had become a national park.

Although she herself found the Everglades “too buggy, too wet, too generally inhospitable” for frequent visits, she soon became the public voice of the effort.

Following the development of a complex system of canals, levees, dams, and pump stations to provide protection from seasonal flooding in former marsh land that was being used for agriculture and real estate development, Mrs. Douglas criticized officials for destroying wetlands, eliminating the sheetflow of water, and upsetting the natural cycles upon which the entire system depends.

Mrs. Douglas taught that the Everglades was more than just a swamp, but instead was a vast, grassy river through which water from Lake Okeechobee flowed through a wide swath of southern Florida stretching from the western suburbs of Miami to the outskirts of Naples and Fort Myers. Some scientists say that water leaving Lake Okeechobee may require months or years to reach its final destination, Florida Bay.

“There are no other Everglades in the world,” she wrote. “they are unique…in the simplicity, the diversity, the related harmony of the forms of life they enclose. The miracle of the light pours over the green and brown expanse of saw grass and of water, shining and slow-moving below, the grass and water that is the meaning and the central fact of the Everglades of Florida.”

Today the park is home to 120 different types of trees, 100 seed bearings plants, and a plethora of animal and bird life including alligators and crocodiles, raccoons, skunks, opossums, bobcats, foxes, white-tail deer and panthers.

In her book, Douglas described the historic nature of the Everglades: “The shores that surround the Everglades were the first on this continent known to white men. The interior was almost the last.”

Her work did not end with the creation of Everglades National Park. She continued to fight against efforts by the Army Corps of Engineers to divert the natural flow of the waters and in 1970, she founded Friends of the Everglades to broaden the constituency for its protection.

After the Stoneman Douglas schools were named for Mrs. Douglas, officials chose wildlife from the Everglades as mascots The Anhinga as was chosen as the mascot of the elementary school while the Eagle became the symbol of the high school.

The Bald Eagle can be found in virtually any kind of American wetland habitat including seacoasts, rivers, large lakes or marshes and other open bodies of water. Meanwhile, the Anhinga is a freshwater bird, sometimes called the “snake bird” in that it has the ability to swim with its body submerged so that only its long neck protrudes out of the water, looking like a snake.

Douglas lived to 108, working until nearly the end of her life for Everglades restoration. Upon her death, an obituary in The Independent in London stated, “In the history of the American environmental movement, there have been few more remarkable figures than Marjory Stoneman Douglas.”

Her ashes were spread in the Everglades National Park.

In the light of the spontaneous activism in the wake of the mass shooting it is altogether appropriate for students from her namesake high school to exhibit the same type of civic engagement in response to this current tragedy.

This article was published in the Times-Georgian newspaper of Carrollton, GA.

Please feel free to leave comments on this site. Those comments posted through the button on this page will be posted if appropriate. Comments sent directly to me are welcome and I will respond, but they will not be posted. Also please forward this link to others who might be interested in this blog. To receive notification of future posts, please click on the “follow” button at the top of this page or write to missionaryjournalist (at) gmail (dot) com. If you no longer wish to receive these announcements, please let me know at that same email address.

Pop theologians and the real meaning of Christmas

By Kenneth D. MacHarg

It’s the Christmas season again, the time for pop-theologians to take to their computers and churn out articles that at best distort the biblical meaning of Christmas. These good-hearted but often uninformed people latch on to a spurious interpretation of the meaning of the holiday and purport to know the theological significance whether they have ever studied it or not.

Take the recent column in an out-of-town newspaper. After skewering those who wish her a “Merry Christmas” or whistle a piece of (secular or not) Christmas music on their way to the water cooler, she offers what she calls “this little…girl’s recommendations on how to really promote the true message of Christmas, ‘Peace on earth, goodwill towards all.’” (The ellipse is the name of her faith, the underlined emphasis is mine.)

Let’s take another look at this from the biblical view—a good starting point. When we do, we can more easily ascertain the “true message of Christmas.”

Yes, the story in Luke 2 does contain the line “Peace on earth, goodwill to those on whom his favor rests.”

But, that phrase provides a deeper understanding of the central point of this passage–that the birth of Jesus, the Son of God, the savior of the world has been born. It means that the focus of the Christmas story is on the birth of the baby Jesus. Peace and goodwill flow out of that act and, as a footnote in the New King James Version Study Bible comments, “the promise of peace and goodwill would come to those who welcome God’s only Son.” (My emphasis)

Here is the complete passage:  “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news that will cause great joy for all the people. 11 Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is the Messiah, the Lord. 12 This will be a sign to you: You will find a baby wrapped in cloths and lying in a manger.”

13 Suddenly a great company of the heavenly host appeared with the angel, praising God and saying,

14 “Glory to God in the highest heaven,
    and on earth peace to those on whom his favor rests.”

 Do you see the focus of this narrative and the message of the angels? It is on the Savior “who has been born to you. He is the Messiah, the Lord”

 The long-anticipated Messiah, forecast throughout what we Christians call the Old Testament, has, at last, been born. That is what is celebrated by the messengers from God, what is proclaimed in their message, that is what has been celebrated by believers in Him throughout the past two-centuries.

As one statement of faith puts it:

In Jesus Christ, the man of Nazareth, our crucified and risen Lord,
he has come to us
and shared our common lot,
conquering sin and death
and reconciling the world to himself.

And, as it later confirms

     He promises to all who trust him
forgiveness of sins and fullness of grace,
courage in the struggle for justice and peace,
his presence in trial and rejoicing,
and eternal life in his kingdom which has no end.

There it is…the affirmation that for those who trust in Christ, there is peace and goodwill.

Professional theologians and every-day readers of God’s Word, the Bible, will see that all of it is in God’s promise, but the exact message of Christmas is the birth of His son, our Savior, Jesus Christ.

Please feel free to leave comments on this site. Those comments posted through the button on this page will be posted if appropriate. Comments sent directly to me are welcome and I will respond, but they will not be posted. Also please forward this link to others who might be interested in this blog. To receive notification of future posts, please click on the “follow” button at the top of this page or write to missionaryjournalist (at) gmail (dot) com. If you no longer wish to receive these announcements, please let me know at that same email address.